I have moved…

I HAVE MOVED!

Please visit my new WEBSITE, GALLERIES and BLOG at the address below…..

Room 2850

RSS
Facebook
Facebook
Instagram
LinkedIn
GOOGLE

Morning light at Robin Hood’s Bay

A few from a wander this morning as the first light of day breaks over Robin Hood’s Bay in North Yorkshire.

Robin Hood’s Bay is a small fishing village located within the North York Moors National Park and five miles south of Whitby. The village, which consists of a maze of tiny streets, had a tradition of smuggling, and there is reputed to be a network of subterranean passageways linking the houses. As the traditional fishing industry in the town began to decline most of the income now comes from tourism and it was recently named as one of the best in the world and is popular for fossil hunting.

 

See more of my work in the galleries on my website here: Room 2850

Images copyright Ian Forsyth 2017 / Getty Images

All rights reserved.

No usage without arrangement.

RSS
Facebook
Facebook
Instagram
LinkedIn
GOOGLE

Jorvik Viking Festival

Hundreds of Viking re-enactors from all over the country take part in a march through the centre of York before fighting a battle during the finale of a living history display in the city. The battle saw hundreds of Viking warriors take to the field recreating the Battle of Stainmore which saw the betrayal and demise of Viking king, Eric Bloodaxe.

The battle was the culmination of a week of family friendly activities in York based around the Jorvik Viking Centre Viking Festival. The activities included Viking encampments, archaeological discoveries, crafting, sword combat sessions and the final battle which all aimed to show the Norse heritage of the region and the connection to York.

See more of my work on my website and blogs… HERE

Images copyright Ian Forsyth 2017 / Getty Images

All rights reserved.

No usage without arrangement.

RSS
Facebook
Facebook
Instagram
LinkedIn
GOOGLE

A River Runs Through It

Today I was offered a great opportunity to go on board the High Tide Adventure and take a trip on the River Tees and offering a unique chance of seeing some of the industrial locations both past and present, along the banks of the river that meanders through the industrial heartland of Teesside.

The boat is named after the High Tide Foundation, a charity formed by PD Ports and aims to raise aspirations and awareness of job opportunities in this sector for young people on Teesside. It is used to provide trips along the river to young people and potential businesses offering a unique perspective on the area.

PD Ports is a shipping and logistics company based on the River Tees and helps to support the international and coastal movement of goods in and out of the north of the UK. It has recently been shortlisted for ‘Port Operator of the Year’.

 

With thanks to the crew of the High Tide Adventure for passing on their river knowledge, to PD Ports and to Nathan Hobday for giving me the opportunity to go aboard.

 

 

See more of my work on my website and blogs… HERE

Images copyright Ian Forsyth 2017 / Getty Images

All rights reserved.

No usage without arrangement.

RSS
Facebook
Facebook
Instagram
LinkedIn
GOOGLE

The Valley

The Valley Gardens area of Saltburn by the Sea is a steep sided valley carved out during the ice-age. The woodland at the head of the valley has remained virtually undisturbed for any years, dating back as far as the time of the great forests.

Much of the valley is quite humid within the steep sided areas before it opens up into a wider plane as it reaches the sea and is subject to sea breezes coming off the North sea. A dense canopy of Oak and Ash trees shelter the winding paths which run the entire length of the valley and Saltburn Gill runs through the centre of it and is fed by two tributaries, The Griff and Darn Bottle.

In 1861 the Saltburn Improvement Company (SIC) started ‘Phase 1’ foundation works on the pleasure gardens. By 1862 and ‘Phase 2’ of the project the SIC had selected the design of the prominent London based landscaper Joseph Newton at a cost of £300. In 1867 Newton’s services were dispensed with and a new head gardener, Mr Everatt was appointed who continued to develop the gardens on the model laid out by Newton.

Developments within the valley included a Croquet Lawn – at that time croquet was a newly fashionable pursuit and the Valley Gardens lawn is possibly home to one of the first purpose built landscaped croquet lawns in England. It is now used as a picnic area near the tea rooms. The Italian Gardens offering ornate flower displays were designed during ‘Phase 2’ and are based on Newton’s proposal in 1865.

There are three bridges that span the beck. The bridge closest to the seafront is made from the parts recovered from the Ha’Penny bridge that spanned the valley before it was demolished. The ‘Halfpenny’ bridge was a typical example of Victorian enterprise and was completed in 1869 at a cost of £7000 and the lives of three workmen. It’s span, on top of seven cast iron supports towering 120 feet above the valley floor, offered spectacular views of the coast and surrounding countryside. The bridge, when it opened, became known as the Halfpenny Bridge and was derived from the fact that pedestrians paid a halfpenny toll to cross. The toll was taken at a toll-booth at one end of the bridge. The toll-house, which was built for the use of the toll-collector at one end of the bridge, still survives today as a private dwelling. The current bandstand marks where the other end of the bridge reached.

Perched on the side of the valley among the trees is the rather out of place looking Albert Memorial. Originally used as the portico at Barnard Castle Railway Station in 1865 it was acquired when the station closed in 1862 by Henry Pease, a director of the Stockton and Darlington Railway Company and who was working on the first plans for the Valley gardens. He arranged for it to be moved to its current location and dedicated to the memory of the recently deceased Prince Consort, Albert, whom Pease highly regarded. It was granted a Grade II listing in 1972.

Another Grade II listing in the Valley Gardens is the railway viaduct. At 150ft high and spanning 783 feet with eleven arched spans it opened in 1872 to extend the line of the Whitby, Redcar and Middlesbrough Union Railway from the prosperous ironstone mines further south. Today it is used primarily for the rolling stock carrying potash from Boulby Mine to the port on Teesside.

In the shadow of the viaduct and near the stepping stones are the bramble covered remains of the old Mill. Thought to have existed since 1649 and it was used for milling until the 1920s. The site continued as a farm but was eventually demolished in 1971.

The Valley hosts a wealth of flora and fauna. With Oak, Ash, and Hazel lining the steep sides of the valley. Yellow flowers of Lesser Celandine cover the floor and are followed by carpets of strong smelling Wild Garlic and Bluebells. Other plants and flowers include Dog’s Mercury, Daffodil, Woodruff, Moschatel along with many different fungi and ferns. Birdlife includes Robin, Blackbird, Wren, Chiffchaff, Spotted Flycatcher, Woodpecker, Kestrel and Kingfisher to name a few.

 

Throughout the year the Valley Gardens remains a hugely popular location with residents and visitors alike, much as it was in Victorian times and especially through the Spring and Summer with people coming to enjoy what the valley has to offer. But take the time to walk a little further and follow the path less trodden and explore all that they offer and you can quickly lose yourself in both the past and the present in this amazing place.

(Click on the first photo to open and then click through the remaining pictures)

See more of my work on my website and blogs… HERE

Images copyright Ian Forsyth 2017

All rights reserved.

No usage without arrangement.

RSS
Facebook
Facebook
Instagram
LinkedIn
GOOGLE

Life’s a Bench

So I’ve been dipping in and out of a project recently that began, quite without intention, a number of years ago where I document the plaques left in memorial to loved ones on benches that I happened to pass as I was out and about on various other jobs or projects. What started out as a couple of quick shots quickly grew until I now have quite a large collection of pictures from towns all along the North Yorkshire coast – Whitby, Scarborough, Saltburn-by-the-Sea, Marske, Robin Hood’s Bay and Port Mulgrave to name a few.

Some are witty and some are simple while others are more complex but each one shows that at some point someone, somewhere cared enough to go to the trouble of making a lasting reminder of someone they knew.

See more of my work on my website and blogs… HERE

Images copyright Ian Forsyth 2017

All rights reserved.

No usage without arrangement.

RSS
Facebook
Facebook
Instagram
LinkedIn
GOOGLE

Building Bridges

The final 100 metre centrepiece of Sunderland’s new River Wear crossing was gradually lifted into place in Sunderland on Friday. The £117 million landmark development by FVB joint Venture is the first new bridge to be built over the River Wear in Sunderland in over four decades. The bridge, which will rise to 105 metres, will have two lanes of traffic in each direction, plus dedicated cycleways and footpaths along its length.

It will be twice the height of Nelson’s Column, and bigger than Big Ben. The new crossing will improve traffic flow across the city from the A19 road through to the city centre and the Port of Sunderland and it is hoped that it will also create opportunities for regeneration and investment along the river bank.

The work continues on Saturday to lift the centrepiece into the fully upright position and the bridge is due to be complete in the spring of 2018.

Stephen McCaffrey, project director for FVB joint Venture

A couple of the pictures ran the next day in the Independent i newspaper and on the BBC website:

See more of my work on my website and blogs… HERE

Images copyright Ian Forsyth 2017 / Getty Images

All rights reserved.

No usage without arrangement.

RSS
Facebook
Facebook
Instagram
LinkedIn
GOOGLE

Whitby Morning

Out and about in Whitby, North Yorkshire this morning to make use of some wonderful light…

TECH STUFF: All pictures in this set were taken on a pair of Leica M9 cameras fitted with 50mm f2 Summicron and 35mm F2 Summicron lenses. The 50mm lens was fitted with a 3-stop ND filter to allow for pictures to be taken at the f2 aperture in the bright sunshine. All pictures were subsequently edited with minor adjustments made in Lightroom and in line with standard editorial editing guidelines. No picture has been doctored or altered in any way.

 

See more of my work on my website and blogs… HERE

Images copyright Ian Forsyth 2017 / Getty Images

All rights reserved.

No usage without arrangement.

RSS
Facebook
Facebook
Instagram
LinkedIn
GOOGLE

Middlesbrough Anti-Trump Demonstration

Campaigners gather during an anti-Trump demonstration in the Centre Square area of Middlesbrough today in the wake of similar events held across the country demonstrators who oppose the policies of the newly-elected US president came onto the streets of Teesside to show their solidarity with refugees, women, Muslims and the LGBT community.

See more of my work on my website and blogs… HERE

Images copyright Ian Forsyth 2017 / Getty Images

All rights reserved.

No usage without arrangement.

RSS
Facebook
Facebook
Instagram
LinkedIn
GOOGLE

Offshore Structures Britain

Based on the banks of the River Tees the Offshore Structures Britain facility at at Haverton Hill provides steel manufacturing, blasting and painting facilities for the serial production of large tubular offshore wind foundations, notably the transition pieces or TP’s, which link the mono pile foundations of offshore wind turbines with the towers.

They have recently signed the contract to manufacture 56 Transition Pieces for the Hornsea Project One offshore wind farm off the Yorkshire coast which when completed will be the biggest wind farm in the world. Offshore Structures Britain was established in 2014 as a joint venture between German steel fabricator EEW Special Pipe Construction GmbH and the Danish steel construction company Bladt Industries A/S and was formally opened in 2015.

After seeing a lovely picture of the site taken by a friend of mine, Dave Cocks I asked him about it and what they did as the size of these TP’s looked quite impressive and this in turn led me to getting in touch and arranging with OSB to go along for Getty Images to shoot some pictures of their facility. The idea being that these pictures might then support any future stories or features about things such as renewable energy, offshore industries, UK and north east manufacturing, engineering and so on.

OSB kindly agreed and so I went along this morning and shot some pictures as I was shown around the site to see the process involved in producing these complex yet impressive structures…

With thanks to Offshore Structures Britain for the access and to Dave Cocks for planting the idea.

See more of my work on my website and blogs… HERE

Images copyright Ian Forsyth 2017 / Getty Images

All rights reserved.

No usage without arrangement.

 

RSS
Facebook
Facebook
Instagram
LinkedIn
GOOGLE