Rosedale Show – 2016

The annual Rosedale show took place yesterday. Founded in 1871 the annual Agricultural, Horticultural and Industrial Society show remains one of the most popular shows in the calendar…

 

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Forward Assist Photo & Writing Project

Geoffrey Bennison (88)

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“When the war broke out I was working as a farmer. I wanted to join the RAF but farming was a reserved occupation so I left and got a job as a porter in Thornaby Hospital. That way I could enlist.

I was a driver in the army and stationed in Egypt for two years. I would often drive from Egypt to Palestine. You had to be careful not to get sunburnt – that was a self-inflicted wound and you’d be put on report. My rank was Leading aircraftman (LAC) and I was also stationed at Thornaby Aerodrome and Bicester Airfield.

I once went on a training flight and the pilot allowed me to take the controls for a while even though I’d never been trained to fly a plane. I also got to drop a bomb and I hit the target.

I stayed on after the war for a further 6 years.”

Joyce Millett (90)

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“I was in the Land Army. We worked out in the fields. It was hard work. We had to feed you lot!

I went to school around Grove Hill. My husband was in the RAF.”

Dennis Metcallfe (89)

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“When I was about five years old I remember going round the streets with the other kids looking for bits of shrapnel to collect. It was like finding treasure, and I’d keep it till it went rusty. We’d explore in places we weren’t supposed to go. I found shells and even part of a rocket once.

After the war I did my National Service in the Army and went to Italy and Egypt. It taught me to look after myself and keep my uniform smart. I thought it was smashing! The food was good but I couldn’t afford to drink because I would send most of my wages home to my mother.”

Alice Irving (94)

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“I served in London as an ambulance driver and remember all the bombing night and day. It was very scary. I treated lots of children, it was such a sad time.”

Vera Sparks (93)

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“I served in the Women’s Auxiliary Force between 1942 and 1946. It was a big thing to serve your country in those days and I wanted to do my thing. I was a cook at Thornaby Aerodrome. I enjoyed being with the lads, serving them their food. I would wave off the young airmen as they left in their aeroplanes, never knowing if they’d return again.

I was also stationed in Alness, Invergordon for about three years. The people were very sociable. The villagers used to come out and wave to us, I felt very safe there. I remember in August 1942 we had a very special visitor: Prince George, the Duke of Kent. We waved him off but were shocked to hear his plane had crashed further north at Caithness.

After the war I went back home to look after my father, but I missed the company.”

Marjorie Roberts (90)

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“My Dad served with the Bantam Regiment during World War 1. He was injured during the Battle of the Somme, losing a leg and sent home for medical care.

During World War Two I served in the Women’s Land Army. Once I was married I followed my husband Theo to his various postings, including Turkey. My Mam was a widow and I wouldn’t leave her on her own so she came with us wherever we went. She didn’t mind travelling as long as we went with her.

When I gave birth to our son Jeff, Theo came home to see his new-born. He was put on a charge of desertion because he hadn’t got permission to leave the base.”

Jimmy (90)  and Margaret Kirk (90)

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“Just after the war I was in an Able Seaman in the Navy. I went to Jamaica, Halifax, Nova Scotia and Gibraltar and served on the HMS Paladin. They were happy days. We’d get a small cup of rum every day, which we called sippers or grog.”

“I was a volunteer Police woman in lodgings in Bedale.”

Joan Forman (94)

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“I was underage when I joined up. I was supposed to be 18 years old but they just turned a blind eye. I joined up at the start of the war and stayed in service for four and a half years – the whole tootie!

I was in the Women’s Auxiliary Force and I served with Bomber Command at Bicester Airfield doing accounts. The lads there bet me five shillings to jump from the parachute trainer platform. I did it more than once.”

From the opening today:

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Labour Leadership Hustings

Owen Smith MP and Jeremy Corbyn MP go head to head during a debate at the Hilton hotel in Gateshead in the second of a series of leadership debates. The result is expected to be announced on September 24…

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Hinderwell Show – 2016

The Hinderwell show in north-east Yorkshire has been held since 1868 providing family entertainment and fun with opportunities for people to show their skills and animals.

This year was the 147th show…here’s a few pictures from the day:

Hinderwell Show © Ian Forsyth 2016 No usage without arrangement

Hinderwell Show © Ian Forsyth 2016 No usage without arrangement

Hinderwell Show © Ian Forsyth 2016 No usage without arrangement

Hinderwell Show © Ian Forsyth 2016 No usage without arrangement

Hinderwell Show © Ian Forsyth 2016 No usage without arrangement

Hinderwell Show © Ian Forsyth 2016 No usage without arrangement

Hinderwell Show © Ian Forsyth 2016 No usage without arrangement

Hinderwell Show © Ian Forsyth 2016 No usage without arrangement

Hinderwell Show © Ian Forsyth 2016 No usage without arrangement

Hinderwell Show © Ian Forsyth 2016 No usage without arrangement

Hinderwell Show © Ian Forsyth 2016 No usage without arrangement

Hinderwell Show © Ian Forsyth 2016 No usage without arrangement

Hinderwell Show © Ian Forsyth 2016 No usage without arrangement

Hinderwell Show © Ian Forsyth 2016 No usage without arrangement

Hinderwell Show © Ian Forsyth 2016 No usage without arrangement

Hinderwell Show © Ian Forsyth 2016 No usage without arrangement

Hinderwell Show © Ian Forsyth 2016 No usage without arrangement

Hinderwell Show © Ian Forsyth 2016 No usage without arrangement

Hinderwell Show © Ian Forsyth 2016 No usage without arrangement

Hinderwell Show © Ian Forsyth 2016 No usage without arrangement

Hinderwell Show © Ian Forsyth 2016 No usage without arrangement

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English National Sheepdog Trials

Some 150 of the best sheepdogs and handlers in the country competed in the 3-day English National Sheepdog Trials on the Castle Howard estate near York this weekend to try and win one of 15 places available in the national team. The winners will go on to represent England at the International trials.

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Kynren – An epic tale of England

Taking its lead from the Puy du Fou theme park in France the Eleven Arches production of KYNREN takes the audience on a journey through 2,000 years of English history as seen through the eyes of Arthur, a 10-year old boy from the North East. He encounters myth, legends and history encompassing Roman times, the Viking and Norman invasions, St Cuthbert and the Lindisfarne Monks, medieval feasts, the Elizabethan era, Georgian Renaissance, the Industrial Revolution and the World Wars.

The spectacular event will be performed for the public on certain nights from July until September – see here for dates – and takes place on a 7.5 acre stage. The event involves more than 1,000 volunteers from the local area as the cast and crew who have all been professionally trained.

I photographed at the press evening performance in June ahead of the opening night which is where these pictures are from but after watching it again last night as part of the regular audience the show is a great spectacle and well worth making the effort to go along and see if you can.

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2016 Borrowby Show

Borrowby Show near Knayton in North Yorkshire was first held in 1949 and is now a regular feature in the show calendar. Field classes cover most farm animals including cattle and sheep and tent classes and exhibits range from farm and garden produce, flowers, cookery, wine, arts & crafts and children’s competitions. The popular event also includes show jumping, a gymkhana and a fancy dress parade and of course the best scarecrow competition!

Here’s a few from today…

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The 150th Ryedale Agricultural Show

The Ryedale Show was established in 1855 and is a traditional agricultural show renowned for its very high standard of entries in all sections. The show is run with both the farming community and townspeople’s interests in mind with eight show rings running throughout the day exhibiting prime cattle, horses, pigs and sheep along with many other attractions for the thousands of visitors who attend the one day long show.

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2016 Sunderland International Air Show

Thousands of people attended the 28th Sunderland International Air Show on July 23, 2016 in Sunderland, England. On and above the seafronts at Roker and Seaburn on the north east coast of England it is the largest free air show in Europe. The spectators are entertained by an impressive display of aircraft from across the world along with a simulated beach assault where Royal Marines Commandos assaulted from landing craft launched from HMS Bulwark and attacking an enemy position, simulated by the Army on the beach. The show is held over three days.

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Some of the pictures from the day also ran here Daily Mail and here Northern Echo

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Saltburn Steampunk

A few from the Saltburn Victorian Steampunk event earlier today…

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2016 Great Yorkshire Show

The annual Great Yorkshire Show now in its 158th year is the UK’s premier agricultural event and brings together agricultural displays, livestock events, farming demonstrations, food, dairy and produce stands as well as equestrian events to the thousands of visitors who attend the popular show over three days to celebrate the farming and agricultural community and their way of life.

Here’s a few pictures from the first day of the show this year…

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

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First day of the Great Yorkshire show

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First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

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First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

First day of the Great Yorkshire show

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The 132nd Durham Miners Gala

More than two decades after the last pit closed in the Durham coalfield the Miners Gala or the Big Meeting as it is known locally remains as popular as ever with over 150,000 expected to attend this year for the 132nd gala. The gala forms part of the culture and heritage of the area and represents the communal values of the North East of England. The gala sees traditional colliery bands march through the city ahead of their respective pit banners and pass the County Hotel building where union leaders, invited guests and dignitaries gather on the balcony before then heading to the racecourse area for a day of entertainment and political speeches. Beginning in 1871 the gala is now the biggest trade union event in Europe and many thousands of people continue to attend each year.

Here’s a few from today…

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Under marble shields

Today marks the anniversary of the start of one of the most bloody battles of World War One. The Battle of the Somme. The battle took place between the 1st of July and the 18 November in 1916 and which by the end of the battle the British Army had suffered 420,000 casualties including nearly 60,000 on the first day alone and the French lost 200,000 men and the Germans nearly 500,000.

The vast majority of those Commonwealth soldiers who were killed were buried either where they fell or in hastily prepared graves nearby. The practice of non-repatriation of the dead was established during the First World War and meant that servicemen and women who died on active service abroad, were buried abroad. The countryside of France and Belgium is peppered with the immaculately maintained cemeteries that are looked after by the CWGC – The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

But closer to home there are many headstones from soldiers of the First World War that are scattered in cemeteries all over the country. The majority of those buried in the United Kingdom are predominantly the men and women who died at home in military hospitals after evacuation from the front. Others may have died in training accidents, some were killed in action in the air or at sea in our coastal waters.

I’ve photographed the headstones of a number of World War One soldiers who have graves marked in cemeteries near where I live. I visited Saltburn, Brotton, Skelton and Guisborough and through the project I made a record of a number of graves of those killed during or soon after the end of WW1.

 

The headstones of all British and Commonwealth are maintained and funded by the CWGC – The Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Facts about the Battle of the Somme:

  1. The Battle of the Somme was originally meant to be a French led offensive with the British in support. It was also initially planned for August 1916
  2. When the German army attacked Verdun in February 1916 it was clear that France would not be able to lead any major offensive in 1916, indeed a British diversionary attack was needed fast to take the pressure of the French and divert German resources away from Verdun. That diversionary attack turned out to be the Battle of the Somme
  3. The preliminary bombardment lasted eight days and saw over 1,600 pieces of British artillery fire 1.73 million shells on to the German lines.
  4. The first infantry attack took place in the early morning of 1st July 1916 – the battle continued until the 18th November
  5. Many of the shells that were fired in that preliminary bombardment were duds and failed to explode. Those that did explode tended to be shrapnel shells which had little effect on barbed wire defences, dugouts and enemy strong points
  6. The average British infantryman carried 30kg of equipment as he went over the top during the first phase of the battle
  7. Britain lost 57,470 casualties (killed and wounded) on the first day of the Battle of the Somme
  8. 19,240 British soldiers were killed on the first day of the battle
  9. The oldest British soldier to die during the battle was Lt Henry Webber, 7th South Lancashire Regiment. He was 68 when he died on 27th July 1916
  10. On 15 September 1916 at Flers-Courcelette the tank made its operational debut. Although they scared many of the German soldiers in the front line, a mixture of poor tactics and unreliability meant that overall they failed to make a great impact
  11. During the Battle of the Somme 51 Victoria Crosses were awarded – 17 of them were awarded posthumously
  12. During the battle between July and November 1916, the French and British armies suffered around 625,000 casualties
  13. Germany casualty figures for the battle are estimated at 500,000
  14. The furthest advance of any allied force during the battle was five miles

 

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Armed Forces Day – Cleethorpes 2016

Out and about at the National Armed Forces Day event in Cleethorpes. Armed Forces Day is an annual event that gives an opportunity for the country to show its support for the men and women in the British Armed Forces.

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The Road to Referendum

Since April I’ve covered quite a few of referendum related visits and events from both sides of the debate around the north as I was documenting this whole process. So here’s a few pics from each event in the order they happened starting with a leave campaign event in Newcastle and finishing with the north-east count in Sunderland…

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Durham Regatta

Rowers from universities and rowing clubs across the country take part in the 183rd annual regatta on the River Wear in Durham this weekend. The present regatta dates back to 1834 and is the second oldest in the country with racing taking place over two days on the river between Prebends Bridge and Pelaw Wood over a 750m short course and a long course of one and a quarter miles. The regatta has its origins in the annual procession of boats, originally organised by the Sheriff of County Durham and the Rt Honourable William Lloyd Wharton, from June 1815 to celebrate the victory at the Battle of Waterloo.

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Appleby Horse Fair – 2016

The Appleby Horse Fair is held each year in early June when around 10,000 – 15,000 English and Welsh gypsies, Scottish and Irish travellers gather to buy and sell horses, meet with friends and relations, and celebrate their culture.

These different groups share a similar lifestyle and culture, and many gypsies and travellers regard Appleby Fair as the most important date in the calendar and it remains one of the largest of their gatherings. An estimated 25-30,000 non-Gypsy people also visit the fair during the week.

The fair is held outside the town of Appleby where the Roman Road crosses Long Marton Road, not far from Gallows Hill, named after the public hangings that were once carried out there. In the mid-20th century the story developed that the fair originated with a royal charter to the borough of Appleby from King James II of England in 1685. However, recent research has shown that the 1685 charter, which was cancelled before it was enrolled, is of no relevance. Appleby’s medieval borough fair, held at Whitsuntide, ceased in 1885.

The ‘New Fair’, held in early June on Gallows Hill, which was then unenclosed land outside the borough boundary, began in 1775 for sheep and cattle drovers and horse dealers to sell their stock. By the 20th Century it had evolved into a major gypsy and traveller occasion. No one bestowed the New Fair, no-one ever owned it and no-one was ever charged to attend it. It was and remains, a true people’s fair

The fair has no organised or scheduled events. The main activities take place on Fair Hill, the main Gypsy campsite field, with some catering and trade stands and more recently on the Market Field or Jimmy Winter’s Field, which was opened up by a local farmer several years ago, and is now the main stall trading and catering area. There are half a dozen licensed campsites nearby. Most horse trading takes place at the crossroads, known to the local authority as Salt Tip Corner and on Long Marton Road, known to the gyspies and travellers as the flashing lane where horses are shown off or ‘flashed’ by trotting up and down the lane at speed.

Many of the horses are also taken down to the Sands, near Appleby town centre and beside the River Eden, where they are ridden into the river to be washed. There is no auction at the fair with arrangements for any sales made between buyer and seller for cash. When the deal is done, the seller will hand back a small part of the price to the buyer for ‘Luck Money’.

The story behind luck money is that if the horse goes wrong, or hurts the new owner, then the luck money will ensure that you cannot curse the seller and a failure to give this money can be seen as grossly insulting.

 

The horse fair has generated some controversy over the years with complaints of mess and rubbish being left in the town and on the camp sites, crime and animal cruelty.

In 2014 there were 28 arrests at the fair, the lowest for several years, for among other things, drug use, drunkenness, and obstruction which senior police confirmed was not disproportionate to other large scale public events.

As regards rubbish and clean-up costs, although the trade stands leave a few tons of waste, the market field and Fair Hill are cleaned of litter the day after the fair, at no cost to the ratepayers, and within a week there is little trace that a fair has been held.

As regards animal cruelty, the RSPCA patrols the fair scrupulously, and although in 2009 Animal Aid called for the fair to be banned the instances of cruelty are few, and they are prosecuted where they do occur. Warnings and advice are given in borderline cases, and the great majority of horses at the fair are well looked after, well treated, and in good condition.

What is clear is that the fair is continuing a proud heritage and tradition among the travelling community and one that brings in much needed income to the town and it remains a colourful and exciting experience for all who attend.

Below are a selection of pictures from the first day of this year’s fair…

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Yorkshire’s Gasland

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Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is a technique designed to recover gas and oil from shale rock. The process involves drilling down into the earth before a high-pressure mixture of water, sand and chemicals are injected into the rock at high pressure which in turn allows the gas to flow out to the head of the well.

The term fracking refers to how the rock is fractured apart by the high pressure mixture.

Drilling for shale gas is at present only at an exploratory phase in the UK after reserves of shale gas were identified across large swathes of the country, particularly in northern England.

More than one hundred licences have been awarded by the government to firms within the UK, allowing them to pursue a range of oil and gas exploration activities in certain areas. But before firms can begin fracking they must also receive planning permission from the relevant local councils.

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Today I was in Northallerton as I covered hundreds of protestors from local campaign groups such as Frack Free Ryedale who along with hundreds of supporters from around the country and neighbouring counties and from environmental groups such as Greenpeace and Friends of the Earth had gathered outside the County Hall building and in the surrounding grounds to voice their opposition to fracking.

They gathered there as the North Yorkshire County Council’s Planning and Regulatory Committee met inside to decide on a fracking application submitted by Third Energy to frack at their current KM8 well-site at Kirby Misperton near Pickering.

The KM8 well-site has been located there for over 20 years during which time it has been producing gas safely and discreetly from the site. The permit applications will allow for fracking activities to be carried out at the site to evaluate the future potential of the shale resource to produce the gas stored there commercially.

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Through the day the committee in Northallerton heard arguments both for and against the planning application. Due to the large number of those who were expected to attend the meeting to speak out against the granting of the application the meeting is expected to reconvene this coming Monday where the decision will be announced.

The opposition to fracking in this area, as in many others around the country has been strong and vocal and it remains a highly contentious issue with individuals, businesses and various environmental groups all voicing their opposition. However the planning officer for the council has already recommended that North Yorkshire County Council approve the application after various consultations have taken place with Third energy.

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If the application is approved on Monday then the plan then would be to fracture five different zones at depths of between 7 – 10,000 feet below ground level to stimulate the gas flow. This gas would then be appraised to check the economic potential and subsequent gas production.

Any gas sourced at the site would be transported by an existing pipeline system to Third Energy’s gas fired power station at Knapton.

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So are there any advantages to fracking?

Well the methods used to drill allow the firms to access difficult-to-reach resources of natural gas.

In the US where fracking is far more common it has significantly boosted domestic oil production and driven down gas prices. It is estimated to have offered gas security to the US and Canada for about 100 years, and has presented an opportunity to generate electricity at half the CO2 emissions of coal.

The industry suggests that the fracking of shale gas could contribute significantly to the UK’s future energy needs and improve our own energy security.

The Task Force on Shale Gas, an industry-funded body, has said the UK needs to start fracking to establish the possible economic impact of shale gas – saying it could create thousands of jobs.

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So why is it so controversial?

The extensive use of fracking in the US, where it has revolutionised the energy industry, has prompted serious environmental concerns. Many areas within the US where fracking is practiced on a far larger scale have many and increasing reports of ill-health due to water contamination.

Fracking uses huge amounts of water, which must be transported to the fracking site by either truck or pipeline all of which comes at significant environmental cost.

Environmentalists say potentially carcinogenic chemicals used in the process may escape and contaminate groundwater around the fracking site. The industry suggests pollution incidents are the results of bad practice, rather than an inherently risky technique and claim that stringent guidelines and processes in place will reduce this risk.

There are also worries that the fracking process can cause small earth tremors and whilst the tremors caused near Blackpool by a fracking operation in 2011 by the firm Cuadrilla were very minor at around 2.3 and 1.5 on the Richter scale this remains an area of concern.

Campaigners say that fracking is simply distracting energy firms and governments from investing in renewable sources of energy, and encouraging continued reliance on fossil fuels and a further increase in already high CO2 levels.

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There is little doubt that as far as the longer term effects of fracking are concerned the practice presents more questions than it answers. Mainly revolving around potential water contamination, increased CO2, the effects of chemicals from the process ending up in the atmosphere and more localised issues such as increased traffic disruption.

Whilst a single drilling site may not produce the same wider scale impact like those that have been reported in the US – our only real source of what fracking looks like on a huge scale – or indeed be the ‘end of the world’ scenario here in Yorkshire that some of the more extreme voices shout about it still raises the question of why, as a country, we should be turning down this road at all?

Just because we can doesn’t mean we should?

There are other avenues to explore that have less potentially devastating consequences if they go wrong? Other options that can be looked at to see if they work – solar power, wind, rain, tidal and geothermal heat all remain options to some degree and need to be explored further before they are disregarded as folly.

As I’ve discovered through research ahead of writing this post fracking is a complicated and divisive subject and will remain so for a long time to come but many say that this form of natural gas extraction should be a very last resort rather than the next step.

With the waters muddied by incorrect or mis-information, complex terminology, over-dramatising and scaremongering, financial interests, far left-wing agendas and less than honourable cross party political motivations from all sides and due to the simple fact of not knowing the long-term repercussions of the drilling method and the effects of the chemicals used then complete transparency and legal accountability at every stage is needed and should be demanded from everyone to avoid the gold-rush like chaos that has been seen in the US.

To frack or not to frack is not just about a small Yorkshire village in isolation. It is far bigger than that. The ultimate effects of fracking on the wider environment will likely remain for a long time to come.

Is that what we want our legacy to be? The final decision on the planning application on Northallerton will be announced on Monday.

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*UPDATE*

The North Yorkshire County Council planning committee voted seven to four in favour of an application by UK firm Third Energy to frack for shale gas near the village of Kirby Misperton.

The application is the first to be approved in the UK since 2011 and the application was passed despite the presence of hundreds of protestors, who gathered outside the County Hall building.

Dozens of speakers attended the meeting outlining concerns over the hydraulic fracturing technique. Objectors raised fears about the environment, safety issues, increased traffic, the effect on the landscape, health and the potentially negative impact on the area’s tourism.

However, supporters – including experts in areas such as noise, water, ecology and landscape – addressed or dismissed the concerns, making statements in support of the application.

Environmental groups, local residents and anti-fracking supporters have said they will continue to fight against the decision.

 

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I then took  trip to Kirby Misperton in Ryedale to have a look at the area, the village itself and to see where the site is located…

 

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For a further look at information about fracking and its potential effects I highly recommend watching the following programmes linked below: ‘Gasland‘ – an Oscar nominated film by Josh Fox on the impacts of fracking and ‘Fracking – The New Energy Rush‘ by BBC Horizon.

 

 

 

See more of my work on my website and blogs… HERE

Images copyright Ian Forsyth/ Getty Images

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No usage without arrangement.

Tour de Yorkshire 2016

As the Tour de Yorkshire entered the third and final stage on Sunday with the 193km leg from Middlesbrough to Scarborough I was starting out in Great Ayton to shoot some pictures in the village ahead of the riders coming through later in the day.

Returning for a second year the hugely popular cycling race has now grown to be one of the most spectacular events in the British sporting calendar. Early reports from this year suggest that around 2 million people watched the race.

Like other legs in the race that took in some of the best scenery around Yorkshire the stage 3 leg would be no exception and even though the weather wasn’t the best the atmosphere among the spectators made up for it. Like most towns and villages along the route many people had come together within their communities to decorate their homes, buildings, walls, windows, benches, lamp posts or anything else that could be found with the yellow and blue race colours or the blue and white of Yorkshire.

Along with the bunting, flags and yellow bicycles there were many other quite imaginative ways of marking the event and everyone entered into the spirit of the occasion. Whilst I can’t speak for every town and village along the route of the Tour de Yorkshire this year I think it’s safe to say that without the support and enthusiasm of the communities along the route the race wouldn’t be half the occasion it has become.

After shooting and filing some pictures first thing from around Great Ayton I then covered the riders as they raced through and were encouraged by cheering crowds lining the streets of the village. After sending those in to the desk I then headed off to Whitby to concentrate on an area of the route that passed close to Whitby Abbey…

 

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See more of my work on my website and blogs… HERE

Images copyright Ian Forsyth/ Getty Images

All rights reserved.

No usage without arrangement.

In or Out?

The European Referendum came to Newcastle upon Tyne today as both the Vote Leave and the Stronger In campaigns came to town.

Firstly Boris Johnson delivered a speech to vote leave activists which, other than three or four people who heckled from the back otherwise went down well to a crowded room in the Centre for Life. The Mayor of London was taking part in a 48 hour ‘Brexit Blitz’ of campaigning in Northern England.

The Britain Stronger In Europe campaign bus also arrived in Newcastle and headed for the Northumbria University’s City Campus where it met up with campaign supporters. The bus came to Tyneside as part of a tour as the In campaign officially begins ahead of the european referendum which takes place on June 23.

(*Impartial alert! – The pictures appear here in the order that I shot them)

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See more of my work on my website and blogs… HERE

Images copyright Ian Forsyth/ Getty Images

All rights reserved.

No usage without arrangement.