A River Runs Through It

Today I was offered a great opportunity to go on board the High Tide Adventure and take a trip on the River Tees and offering a unique chance of seeing some of the industrial locations both past and present, along the banks of the river that meanders through the industrial heartland of Teesside.

The boat is named after the High Tide Foundation, a charity formed by PD Ports and aims to raise aspirations and awareness of job opportunities in this sector for young people on Teesside. It is used to provide trips along the river to young people and potential businesses offering a unique perspective on the area.

PD Ports is a shipping and logistics company based on the River Tees and helps to support the international and coastal movement of goods in and out of the north of the UK. It has recently been shortlisted for ‘Port Operator of the Year’.

 

With thanks to the crew of the High Tide Adventure for passing on their river knowledge, to PD Ports and to Nathan Hobday for giving me the opportunity to go aboard.

 

 

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Images copyright Ian Forsyth 2017 / Getty Images

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The Valley

The Valley Gardens area of Saltburn by the Sea is a steep sided valley carved out during the ice-age. The woodland at the head of the valley has remained virtually undisturbed for any years, dating back as far as the time of the great forests.

Much of the valley is quite humid within the steep sided areas before it opens up into a wider plane as it reaches the sea and is subject to sea breezes coming off the North sea. A dense canopy of Oak and Ash trees shelter the winding paths which run the entire length of the valley and Saltburn Gill runs through the centre of it and is fed by two tributaries, The Griff and Darn Bottle.

In 1861 the Saltburn Improvement Company (SIC) started ‘Phase 1’ foundation works on the pleasure gardens. By 1862 and ‘Phase 2’ of the project the SIC had selected the design of the prominent London based landscaper Joseph Newton at a cost of £300. In 1867 Newton’s services were dispensed with and a new head gardener, Mr Everatt was appointed who continued to develop the gardens on the model laid out by Newton.

Developments within the valley included a Croquet Lawn – at that time croquet was a newly fashionable pursuit and the Valley Gardens lawn is possibly home to one of the first purpose built landscaped croquet lawns in England. It is now used as a picnic area near the tea rooms. The Italian Gardens offering ornate flower displays were designed during ‘Phase 2’ and are based on Newton’s proposal in 1865.

There are three bridges that span the beck. The bridge closest to the seafront is made from the parts recovered from the Ha’Penny bridge that spanned the valley before it was demolished. The ‘Halfpenny’ bridge was a typical example of Victorian enterprise and was completed in 1869 at a cost of £7000 and the lives of three workmen. It’s span, on top of seven cast iron supports towering 120 feet above the valley floor, offered spectacular views of the coast and surrounding countryside. The bridge, when it opened, became known as the Halfpenny Bridge and was derived from the fact that pedestrians paid a halfpenny toll to cross. The toll was taken at a toll-booth at one end of the bridge. The toll-house, which was built for the use of the toll-collector at one end of the bridge, still survives today as a private dwelling. The current bandstand marks where the other end of the bridge reached.

Perched on the side of the valley among the trees is the rather out of place looking Albert Memorial. Originally used as the portico at Barnard Castle Railway Station in 1865 it was acquired when the station closed in 1862 by Henry Pease, a director of the Stockton and Darlington Railway Company and who was working on the first plans for the Valley gardens. He arranged for it to be moved to its current location and dedicated to the memory of the recently deceased Prince Consort, Albert, whom Pease highly regarded. It was granted a Grade II listing in 1972.

Another Grade II listing in the Valley Gardens is the railway viaduct. At 150ft high and spanning 783 feet with eleven arched spans it opened in 1872 to extend the line of the Whitby, Redcar and Middlesbrough Union Railway from the prosperous ironstone mines further south. Today it is used primarily for the rolling stock carrying potash from Boulby Mine to the port on Teesside.

In the shadow of the viaduct and near the stepping stones are the bramble covered remains of the old Mill. Thought to have existed since 1649 and it was used for milling until the 1920s. The site continued as a farm but was eventually demolished in 1971.

The Valley hosts a wealth of flora and fauna. With Oak, Ash, and Hazel lining the steep sides of the valley. Yellow flowers of Lesser Celandine cover the floor and are followed by carpets of strong smelling Wild Garlic and Bluebells. Other plants and flowers include Dog’s Mercury, Daffodil, Woodruff, Moschatel along with many different fungi and ferns. Birdlife includes Robin, Blackbird, Wren, Chiffchaff, Spotted Flycatcher, Woodpecker, Kestrel and Kingfisher to name a few.

 

Throughout the year the Valley Gardens remains a hugely popular location with residents and visitors alike, much as it was in Victorian times and especially through the Spring and Summer with people coming to enjoy what the valley has to offer. But take the time to walk a little further and follow the path less trodden and explore all that they offer and you can quickly lose yourself in both the past and the present in this amazing place.

(Click on the first photo to open and then click through the remaining pictures)

See more of my work on my website and blogs… HERE

Images copyright Ian Forsyth 2017

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Life’s a Bench

So I’ve been dipping in and out of a project recently that began, quite without intention, a number of years ago where I document the plaques left in memorial to loved ones on benches that I happened to pass as I was out and about on various other jobs or projects. What started out as a couple of quick shots quickly grew until I now have quite a large collection of pictures from towns all along the North Yorkshire coast – Whitby, Scarborough, Saltburn-by-the-Sea, Marske, Robin Hood’s Bay and Port Mulgrave to name a few.

Some are witty and some are simple while others are more complex but each one shows that at some point someone, somewhere cared enough to go to the trouble of making a lasting reminder of someone they knew.

See more of my work on my website and blogs… HERE

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Building Bridges

The final 100 metre centrepiece of Sunderland’s new River Wear crossing was gradually lifted into place in Sunderland on Friday. The £117 million landmark development by FVB joint Venture is the first new bridge to be built over the River Wear in Sunderland in over four decades. The bridge, which will rise to 105 metres, will have two lanes of traffic in each direction, plus dedicated cycleways and footpaths along its length.

It will be twice the height of Nelson’s Column, and bigger than Big Ben. The new crossing will improve traffic flow across the city from the A19 road through to the city centre and the Port of Sunderland and it is hoped that it will also create opportunities for regeneration and investment along the river bank.

The work continues on Saturday to lift the centrepiece into the fully upright position and the bridge is due to be complete in the spring of 2018.

Stephen McCaffrey, project director for FVB joint Venture

A couple of the pictures ran the next day in the Independent i newspaper and on the BBC website:

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Whitby Morning

Out and about in Whitby, North Yorkshire this morning to make use of some wonderful light…

TECH STUFF: All pictures in this set were taken on a pair of Leica M9 cameras fitted with 50mm f2 Summicron and 35mm F2 Summicron lenses. The 50mm lens was fitted with a 3-stop ND filter to allow for pictures to be taken at the f2 aperture in the bright sunshine. All pictures were subsequently edited with minor adjustments made in Lightroom and in line with standard editorial editing guidelines. No picture has been doctored or altered in any way.

 

See more of my work on my website and blogs… HERE

Images copyright Ian Forsyth 2017 / Getty Images

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Middlesbrough Anti-Trump Demonstration

Campaigners gather during an anti-Trump demonstration in the Centre Square area of Middlesbrough today in the wake of similar events held across the country demonstrators who oppose the policies of the newly-elected US president came onto the streets of Teesside to show their solidarity with refugees, women, Muslims and the LGBT community.

See more of my work on my website and blogs… HERE

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Offshore Structures Britain

Based on the banks of the River Tees the Offshore Structures Britain facility at at Haverton Hill provides steel manufacturing, blasting and painting facilities for the serial production of large tubular offshore wind foundations, notably the transition pieces or TP’s, which link the mono pile foundations of offshore wind turbines with the towers.

They have recently signed the contract to manufacture 56 Transition Pieces for the Hornsea Project One offshore wind farm off the Yorkshire coast which when completed will be the biggest wind farm in the world. Offshore Structures Britain was established in 2014 as a joint venture between German steel fabricator EEW Special Pipe Construction GmbH and the Danish steel construction company Bladt Industries A/S and was formally opened in 2015.

After seeing a lovely picture of the site taken by a friend of mine, Dave Cocks I asked him about it and what they did as the size of these TP’s looked quite impressive and this in turn led me to getting in touch and arranging with OSB to go along for Getty Images to shoot some pictures of their facility. The idea being that these pictures might then support any future stories or features about things such as renewable energy, offshore industries, UK and north east manufacturing, engineering and so on.

OSB kindly agreed and so I went along this morning and shot some pictures as I was shown around the site to see the process involved in producing these complex yet impressive structures…

With thanks to Offshore Structures Britain for the access and to Dave Cocks for planting the idea.

See more of my work on my website and blogs… HERE

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Year of the Rooster

Thousands of visitors came to Chinatown in Newcastle Upon Tyne to watch and take part in the Chinese New Year celebrations to mark The Year of the Rooster.

Chinese New Year is China’s most important traditional festival and brings families and communities together for a week long public holiday.

TECH STUFF: All pictures in this set were taken on a pair of Leica M9 cameras fitted with 50mm f2 Summicron and 35mm F2 Summicron lenses. The 50mm lens was fitted with a 3-stop ND filter to allow for pictures to be taken at the f2 aperture in the bright sunshine. All pictures were subsequently edited with minor adjustments made in Lightroom and in line with standard editorial editing guidelines. No picture has been doctored or altered in any way.

See more of my work on my website and blogs… HERE

Images copyright Ian Forsyth 2017 / Getty Images

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Women’s March – London

On the day following the inauguration of Donald Trump as the 45th President of the United States close to 100,000 protestors marched on London to voice their opposition to his presidency and to spread a message of inclusiveness and positivity in the wake of the rising tide of intolerance and division that has emerged from the US election.

The Women’s March On London was one of hundreds of similar protests taking place in major cities around the globe with participants of all genders, races and political beliefs taking part. In their mission statement the march organisers said that their aim was to take a stand against a growing right-wing political sentiment in all its forms, including homophobia, transphobia, anti-muslim bigotry, misogyny, class prejudice and racism.

The London march gathered outside the US embassy in Grosvenor Square in Mayfair before marching through Park Lane, Piccadilly, Pall Mall and into Trafalgar Square for a rally with politicians and activists addressing the crowds.

The largest rally took place in Washington DC with an estimated half a million people taking to the streets and unconfirmed reports suggest that more protestors attended the Washington Women’s March than Trump supporters who attended the inauguration.

TECH STUFF: All pictures in this set were taken on a pair of Leica M9 cameras fitted with 50mm f2 Summicron and 35mm F2 Summicron lenses. The 50mm lens was fitted with a 3-stop ND filter to allow for pictures to be taken at the f2 aperture in the bright sunshine. All pictures were subsequently edited with minor adjustments made in Lightroom and in line with standard editorial editing guidelines. No picture has been doctored or altered in any way.

See more of my work on my website and blogs… HERE

Images copyright Ian Forsyth 2017.

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And now…the weather

So…and bare with me here because this first part is nothing to do with the weather! But it helps explain how a long shift began…

First thing Thursday morning saw me heading over to a newly built Equine Clinic near Great Ayton. I was there to photograph a visit around this impressive facility by Princess Anne who was expected later that morning. But a little later as various dignitaries and guests were all waiting we were informed that due to an issue with her helicopter the visit would have to be cancelled! So after a look around the clinic and seeing some great potential for pictures and arranging to go back to do a photo-story I headed off to change from my suit – jobs with Royals generally require a suit to be worn – into more weather appropriate clothing!

Today was the start of increasing media interest in the ‘Storm Surge’ that was expected along the east coast soon – jobs with weather generally require wellies to be worn!

Below are a selection of my pictures from what turned out to be a long stretch of sleepless activity as I tried to cover events in the ‘shire.

 

Now whilst cold and a little blustery there was nothing special going on along the east coast at first. But it was an opportunity to try and get some shots of people preparing their homes or businesses ahead of the expected surge. So after speaking to my good friend and very talented Whitby based photographer Ceri Oakes who was also covering events I had a quick run down to Sandsend.

From this I was able to get a few pictures of a couple of the Whitby lifeboat crew members as they helped to board up the windows of a pub whose landlord had broken his leg. So they volunteered to go along and help protect it – although members of the crew also drink there but I’m sure that had nothing to do with it. Almost sure? Along with this there were a few ok pictures of waves crashing against the sea wall and a few people loading up their car boots from a council supplied pile of sandbags but other than that it was quiet.

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As it was getting dark and I was losing the light and there weren’t many pictures to be had I headed back to Saltburn for a quick bit of admin and a bite to eat before heading back to Whitby a couple of hours later ahead of the first high tide at 0415 the next morning which was expected to be the first sign of the surge hitting the east coast.

As I drove back through Saltburn I noticed a couple of council trucks entering the lower promenade car park. Thinking they might be doing some prep work ahead of the surge I followed them in and I was able to get a couple of pictures of them as they off-loaded pallets of sand bags near to beach front businesses.

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After a brief pit stop at home in Saltburn I headed down to Whitby. I maybe went a little too early than was really needed but I knew I wouldn’t settle just sitting there at home knowing this was going on soon and I knew that they might close the coast road on the Whitby approach and I didn’t want to have to drive all the way around.

Knowing that with the high tide still a few hours away I wasn’t going to get any ‘dramatic’ pictures as far as waves went but it was an opportunity to walk around the dark streets of Whitby to see what preparations had been made by residents and the council. So I was able to see shop front doorways sand bagged, a large pump deployed ready to be used if needed and other details around the town.

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As I met up with Ceri again and we wandered the streets of Whitby like two wellington-boot-clad hobo’s we called into the Lifeboat station – where she works as the volunteer press officer – to get a bit of an update from the crew and to grab a brew. Now as you’d expect from lifeboat crew members who volunteer to do the great work they do they’re part mad and part balls of steel! And so they were taking all this talk of tidal surges in their stride and it was then, talking to them, that it was clear that the water might not breach the harbour and seawalls on that high tide.

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As the high tide time came and went and with the wind not as strong as anticipated the streets were almost deserted apart from the occasional members of Mountain Rescue, Coastguard Rescue, Environment Agency, RNLI, police and fire services who were all there at various points ready to offer help if needed should the water overtop the harbour. Fortunately this time they weren’t needed and with the town now safe from this high tide after a couple of pictures on the bridge as Ian Hugill from Scarborough & Ryedale Mountain Rescue gave a final check of the water levels I headed back to my car to edit, caption and file my pictures.

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With daylight approaching I was going to head back home. The next high tide wasn’t for another 12-hours or so and that one was of concern as the wind was due to be stronger. The Shipping Forecast, that amazingly poetic and hugely useful weather and sea-state information service from BBC Radio 4 was giving gale forecasts showing ‘severe gale 9 to violent storm 11’ – ‘violent storm’ is one down from the maximum used, Hurricane Force! – so potential to be a bit blustery then.

As I was leaving it began to snow quite heavy. So not wanting to miss the opportunity I shot a few pictures in the Whitby and Loftus areas as I headed back to Saltburn. After a quick bite to eat I once again headed out to try and make something of any overnight snowfall locally. Whilst we didn’t see the snow fall that other parts of the country had I was able to shoot some pictures of snowmen and cute donkeys and some wintery views in the Commondale and Great Ayton areas.

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With the day getting on and the next high tide in Whitby around 4pm or so I took a couple of hours to quickly head to South Gare near Redcar to see if the waves were crashing against the seawall and lighthouse as they sometimes do on a big swell. Not surprisingly they were quite impressive and I sat myself in the nearby dunes, wedged my camera against my knees and spent some time glued to the viewfinder as the unpredictable waves did their thing.

While I don’t think it’s the most impressive lighthouse in this area for these dramatic wave type shots – for that go to Seaham – you can still get some alright stuff from it. But it pays to sit somewhere out of the wind and be patient. Photographing big waves here is tricky. It’s not like surfing where you can read the waves better and see a set coming. In wild, violent seas the water is all over the place and you can guarantee that as soon as you rest your eye from the viewfinder the days’ monster wave will arrive and you miss it while all you hear from all the photographers’ around you are the machine-gunning motor drives doing the business!

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But it made for some ok pictures and added to the general coverage of the crazy weather we were having. Now admittedly at this point I was knackered. I’d been on the go without sleep for nearly 30 hours or so and was looking forward to a shower, some dinner and probably a bit of wine! But being the conscientious and professional (haha really!?) photographer I am I checked in once again with the top Whitby-based photographer Ceri to see what if anything was going on and to get a quick update a couple of hours before high tide and make the call about going from there.

I can’t really remember all the conversation I had with her about what was going on. All I heard was, “water coming over a bit” and “bandstand” and “could be on”!

Now as any photographer shooting news will tell you missing an ‘event’ that takes place nearby is very frustrating if you weren’t aware of it. If the intention is to be there and you miss it then it’s bloody annoying so, and with complete regard to all motoring laws and speed limits, I drove to Whitby! Arriving as they say ‘in the nick of time’ I parked on West cliff and headed into town.

With high tide fast approaching, wind roaring it was a very surreal scene. Looking down onto the town from West Cliff offers a spectacular view anyway. Add to this hundreds of people standing there watching, freezing cold wind howling off the sea, amazing light shining down at sunset and huge waves rolling in it was quite an amazing sight. I think there was even a rainbow thrown in there at some point?!

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Other than a couple of quick pictures I knew I needed to head down the hill. You have to be where the water is after all! So I went down to Pier Road which was getting the brunt of the sea’s anger. The builder’s rubble sacks that were filled with sand on the slip way were scattered everywhere and there was debris brought in by the water all over the street. Members of the Coastguard were keeping people back from the deluge of foam-covered water each time it breached and flowed along the road for hundreds of yards. The ice cream kiosk near the slip way had already been ‘relocated’ by one particularly large wave and it was obvious that this was the place to be for pictures.

Now amid the chaos of everything that was going on there was a moment when, just like in the movies, it all seemed to go quiet! People seemed to stop, the waves eased and everyone’s attention turned to the old lady in her motorised scooter who was heading straight up the street towards the cordon tape put in place by the Coastguard.

After the coastguard chap explained politely to her that it was probably not the wisest journey to continue up the street towards the churning water on her scooter she paused, had one final look towards this annoyance that was now splashing over the slipway and flowing towards her – and I would swear here that she tutted to it – before carrying out a pretty slick 3-point turn and motoring off into the foam filled streets as she was forced to take a longer route to wherever she was heading. Nicely done!

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With the light fading fast we headed further into town to see what else was going on in the New Quay Road area and to work some pictures there. This is an area that is always prone to flooding and arriving there the water was already coming over the top of the harbour wall. Fishing boats were floating at street level and it made a surreal sight. Even though their moorings had been slackened by their owners to allow for the rise in water level one of the moorings was torn off as the boat rose but fortunately a second rope held it and it didn’t break loose. Shops and restaurant staff stood behind flood shutters in doorways and looked on as water flowed around the street but it was soon clear that this wasn’t as bad a flood surge as it could have been and thankfully with minimal damage it wouldn’t take too long for the water to eventually drain away.

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So with the main threat from the high tide now passed and with the surge heading away from our part of the coastline we headed back to Pier Road for a final look there for any other pictures before I headed back up to my car to edit, caption and file the pictures in to the picture desk as quickly as possible. With nature once again demonstrating its amazing abilities and with some great work by emergency service personnel, with communities all along the east coast coming together to protect their homes, properties and businesses it all offered up some decent photographs and more importantly the damage and disruption wasn’t as bad as it might have been.

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With nearly 35 hours on the go without sleep, with a routine of charging up various electronic ‘stuff’ as I drove around between locations and grabbing quick food as and when and with the challenge of the working conditions it was a challenging time but ultimately quite rewarding as a photographer. So with thanks to Ceri for the updates and info, to the Whitby lifeboat crew members for the brew on a cold night here’s a few ways the pictures were used in the media over the following days…

For those interested in such things all the pictures in this set were shot on my Fuji gear. The wide shots were on the Fuji X Pro 2 with a 16mm f1.4 lens and the longer tight stuff on a Fuji XT1 with a 50-140mm f2.8.

See more of my work on my website and blogs… HERE

Images copyright Ian Forsyth / Getty Images

All rights reserved.

No usage without arrangement

 

 

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